The AllSeen Alliance, an open source IoT initiative endorsed by the Linux Foundation, has announced significant steps toward making its vision of open connected devices a reality with the introduction of new devices certified for the AllJoyn software framework.

AllJoyn is an open source platform for IoT device discovery and connectivity. It's the tool that the AllSeen Alliance, a collaborative project supported by a number of industry partners, is promoting as the basis for creating an open, standards-compliant IoT.

At CES 2016 this week the AllSeen Alliance announced about a dozen new products that have received AllJoyn certification. They represent a diverse set of devices, ranging from a Buffalo AirStation wireless router, to LG's wireless modules for connected air conditioners, to Microsoft Surface Pro 3 tablets running Windows 10.

To be sure, the certified devices constitute only a tiny slice of the IoT market. But the announcement is a start in the AllSeen effort to build an IoT based on open connection standards -- a strategy that the organization sees as vital for preventing vendor lock-in and barriers to innovation.

"The recent surge in AllJoyn Certified products, combined with many other companies pursuing certification, demonstrate the AllSeen Alliance continues to have great momentum," said Danny Lousberg, the newly elected AllSeen Alliance Chairperson and Director Product Management at Technicolor.

The AllSeen Alliance is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project. That means the Linux Foundation supports the initiative, whose funding comes from industry partners.