The Linux Foundation's OpenDaylight project for advancing open source software-defined networking (SDN) continues to grow. Infinera and KEMP Technologies are the latest additions to the initiative, which now also counts more than 220 developers.

Both of these newest OpenDaylight members bring expertise in network infrastructure and bandwidth management to the project. Infinera specializes in delivering high-speed connectivity for the cloud—specifically, connections of up to 500 Gb/s, which it provides by leveraging next-generation Phototonic Integrated Circuits technology.

KEMP, meanwhile, is a major vendor for load-balancing network hardware, including virtual solutions. The company said it hopes to continue advancing open source SDN solutions that take advantage of the latest developments in load balancing to optimize network performance and security.

The expansion of OpenDaylight, which now has 41 members, comes as the project looms as an increasingly large presence in the worlds of networking and open source development. The second version of the OpenDaylight platform, Helium, is scheduled for release this fall, and the project will be hosting an OpenDaylight hackfest and mini-summit this October in Dusseldorf during CloudOpen Europe and OpenFlow World Congress.

OpenDaylight leaders are keen to promote these developments as evidence of the preeminence of open source technology within the maturing SDN world. "We are seeing a major shift in networking away from fully proprietary SDN approaches to those that are more open and interoperable. It's happening right now, and the OpenDaylight community is a major driver of this shift," said Neela Jacques, executive director, OpenDaylight. "Our community is very interested in supporting innovation in cloud-based and optical networking solutions, which is a perfect fit for our newest members, and we welcome their contributions and support."