The Linux Foundation has extended its partner network further this week with the addition of BearingPoint GmbH, Daynix, Linaro Limited and Systena, who will add to the open source consortium's strengths in cloud computing, Internet of Things technology, Linux-based embedded automotive computers and more.

As the official announcement details, each of these new members of the Linux Foundation, a nonprofit consortium focused on promoting Linux and open source software, will help to expand the organization's reach to several industries and segments of the channel across the world.

Perhaps the most interesting part of the news, however, is that surrounding Linaro, which focuses on developing open source software for ARM devices. Since next-generation embedded Linux solutions that can power the software systems of cars and devices in the Internet of Things appear increasingly to be the next big thing in the open source world, and because many of those devices are likely to run on ARM hardware, Linaro's signing-on to the Linux Foundation could pay particularly large dividends going forward for helping open source developers to collaborate within the embedded niche.

Actually, it's surprising that Linaro, founded in 2010, wasn't already a memeber of the Linux Foundation, which has had its sights for some time now on advancing Linux for embedded devices.

Linaro is celebrating the news, too, as a natural move for a company with a strong open source vision. Rob Booth, COO at Linaro Limited, said, "The Linux Foundation's philosophy aligns well with our goals to accelerate industry-wide innovation using shared resources to advance the ARM ecosystem. We're excited to see Linux developers using open source in such a wide variety of creative of ways, from wearable and mobile solutions right through to transportation, energy and server infrastructure projects. Linaro looks forward to working closely with the Linux Foundation to help accelerate innovation across all of these markets."