Network security technology provider Fortinet (FTNT) is rolling out a whopping nine new products in its FortiGate lineup designed to work together to provide end-to-end, unified threat management (UTM) for enterprises and distributed environments such as retail environments and branch offices. The announcement was made at the tail end of Fortinet’s 2014 Global Partner Conference aboard the Brilliance of the Seas cruise ship Jan. 9-13.

The lineup includes four FortiGate security appliances, two wireless access points (APs), a wireless WAN extender and two Ethernet switches, which the company says brings the promise of its Connected UTM vision.

The FortiGate security appliances (FortiGate/FortiWiFi-30D-POE, FortiGate/FortiWiFi-60D-POE and FortiGate/FortiWiFi-90D-POE and FortiGate-280D-POE) include the full complement of Fortinet UTM technology, and offer wi-fi AP control, switching, endpoint management, authentication and policy control to better enable enforcement across multiple devices and types.

What’s more, the appliances include Power over Ethernet (PoE) ports, giving users the ability to connect and manage multiple devices such as POS systems, video cameras and unified communications systems—anything that might need to be controlled with a special focus on security.

The wireless APs (FortiAP-221C and FortiAP-320C) support 802.11ac and enable users to segment their network traffic to meet compliance such as PCI DSS while still offering higher-speed wireless access to guest accounts.

The FortiExtender-100B wireless WAN extender acts as a 3G/4G extender for companies needing broadband connectivity, improving data relay between the service provider and a FortiGate device, which can be as far as 100 meters from the FortiExtender, according to the company.

Finally, the FortiSwitch-224D-POE and FortiSwitch-108D-POE switching appliances provide up to 24 10/100/1000) access ports and up to 12 PoE ports, enabling users to integrate IP devices into the network, offering FortiGate security to the devices.

The new technologies include analytics the company noted can give users a view into the behavior of their employees, customers or anyone interacting with the technology—or even entering a store. Such “reverse showrooming” can tell retailers, for example, who came into the store, checked the price on an item in the store and compared it to the price online, and either purchased or walked out of the store. Using the analytics, the retailer could immediately lower the price on an item to keep a customer from purchasing the item online.