Nexsan is playing a pivotal role in the research and observation of one of Albert Einstein’s most groundbreaking scientific predictions, thanks to a partnership with Caltech’s Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO).

The unified storage solution provider’s E-Series and BEAST solutions are currently being used as the primary block storage devices for Caltech’s data archive, which stores raw instrument data and analytics information. LIGO is currently standardized on Nexsan’s E-Series and BEAST solutions, which are being used to store a whopping 6.4 PB of research data on the gravitational waves created by the merger of black holes.

Put simply, Nexsan’s equipment is responsible for housing research that confirms one of the previously unproven predictions put forth by Einstein in his ubiquitous general theory of relativity.

"It's an honor to be a part of such a scientifically historical achievement in LIGO's proven discovery of colliding black holes," said Geraldine Osman, vice president of International Marketing, Nexsan, in a statement. "The high volume and intensity of data use for this research project was nothing short of awe-striking.”

Caltech’s strategic partner Westlake Technologies Inc. (WTI) recommended Nexsan’s solutions to handle the massive influx of data needed to study Einstein’s prediction, according to the company. The E-Series and BEAST systems are currently being used as the primary block storage devices for Caltech’s data archive, which stores raw instrument data and analytics information.

More than 26 PB of Nexsan solutions have been deployed to run Caltech’s research operations over the past nine years, according to Jennifer Manzano, CEO of Westlake Technologies.

"The discovery of the gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes opens a new window on the universe by beginning the era of observational gravitational-wave astronomy," said Stuart B. Anderson, Senior Research Scientist, LIGO Caltech. "We will continue to improve the sensitivity of the LIGO instruments and probe ever further out into the Universe. Nexsan and Westlake will be with us on this ongoing exploration of colliding black holes, neutron stars and hopefully many other exciting unexpected discoveries."