The VAR Guy Blog

Natural Disasters Should Prompt BDR Discussion with Customers

Springtime into summer may be great for the beach, baseball and blooming flowers, but it also dials up the potential for natural disasters. And that makes it a great time to discuss BDR strategies with your clients.

A sure way to get your foot in the door at new accounts is to offer clients a reliable and affordable data backup and disaster recovery (BDR) service. BDR is the most popular service offered by providers, topping even network monitoring, security and storage, according to CompTIA.

Solution providers of all stripes should offer this much-needed service to clients. Springtime into summer may be great for the beach, baseball and blooming flowers, but it also dials up the potential for natural disasters. And that makes it a great time to discuss BDR strategies with your clients.

For those who already have a strategy in place, you can take the opportunity to review existing plans to assess whether they still meet all of the clients’ requirements. Are all new users included in the backup process? Are they aware of recovery procedures in the event of a disaster? Have any systems been installed recently that require some kind of upgrade to the BDR?

With clients that don’t back up at all or have a lackadaisical attitude toward the need to back up data, you need to have a much more serious conversation. Failing to back up, or doing it sporadically, could put a client out of business if hit by a natural disaster.

Consider these statistics compiled by the Eastern Kentucky University Department of Safety, Security, and Emergency Management:

  • One in three small business owners have been affected by “storm or extreme weather.”
  • One in four SMB companies do not reopen after being hit by a storm.
  • Small businesses lose an average of $3,000 a day when closed by a storm.
  • Natural disasters have cost the global economy $2.5 trillion since 2000.

If these statistics won’t inspire your clients to sign up for BDR, probably nothing else will.

Off-site Requirements

When discussing BDR in the context of natural disasters, the off-site component is especially critical. Businesses need to replicate their data at an off-site location in case a natural disaster destroys their facilities. As a general practice, backups don’t do much good if they are kept in the same building as the regular data.

With this in mind, you should educate clients about the advantages of a cloud-based data backup service that creates copies of all their business data in a safe place. You also should help clients prioritize which systems, applications and files to access first in the event of a disaster. For instance, a business heavily dependent on online sales will need its ecommerce and warehouse systems resume operations first.

In a worst-case scenario that a building becomes unusable, off-site data replication allows a business to reopen quickly. And that’s a big reason cloud-based BDR is necessary: It might just save your client’s business.

Marvin Blough is Vice President of Worldwide Sales, StorageCraft. Marvin joined the StorageCraft family in January 2016, bringing with him more than 30 years of experience of successfully leading global direct and channel go-to-market efforts in IT security and software. At StorageCraft, Marvin's focus as vice president of worldwide sales is on expanding the company’s global reach by establishing channel partnerships that enhance the profitability for the channel partner. Marvin is also responsible for working closely with international distributors to introduce the StorageCraft product line into new markets. Prior to joining the StorageCraft family, Marvin served as a Vice President of Worldwide Sales at SonicWALL for nine years, during which his success resulted in eight CRN Channel Chief awards. Marvin received his bachelor’s degree in business from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Discuss this Blog Entry 0

Post new comment
or register to use your The VAR Guy ID



Sponsored Introduction Continue on to (or wait seconds) ×